Apr

28

Maple and Bloodwood Handplane

By Jim

I’ve recently been able to get back in to the shop.  While working on a toybox for my neice that I started almost two years ago, I stole some time to make a wooden handplane.  I’ve been wanting to do this for a while since I found these plans.

After shopping for a while, I found blades for wooden planes from Lee Valley. They gave enough information for me to realize it was basically just a rectangular piece of metal with a bevel ground on one end. Being cheapfrugal, I searched and found a similarly sized piece of the same O1 tool steel from onlinemetals.com. This cost about the same price for a length that would yeild at least three plane blades.

I made the body and wedge out of hard maple, and the sole and pin out of bloodwood. Both hard and dense woods that should last for a long time. As you can see, my metal-working skills aren’t quite up to par, but the blade should do.

There are a couple of other different sets of plans for wooden hand planes that I want to make too:


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Nov

30

Wood Balls

By Jim

This is perhaps my most impractical yet most interesting project.  People who visit my house and see them can’t help but pick them up and ask what kind of wood each one is.  To answer that question, look at the picture with the balls in a row.  From left to right the woods are maple, red oak, cherry, chakte viga, mahogany, ipe, wenge, black palm, bubinga, chakte kok, bloodwood and purpleheart.  It’s tough to make out some of the darker colors, but it’s a good sampling.  I intended these to be my samples for folks to pick out woods for projects instead of the traditional 1/2″x3″x6″ block.  I’ll have to make more someday to reflect all the species with which I work.

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Nov

30

Walnut & Maple Segmented Vase

By Jim

I made this for my wife for our fifth wedding anniversary as the traditional gift is wood.  It’s made from 126 pieces of walnut and maple, plus one ebony plug in the base.

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Nov

30

Bubinga Seed Pot

By Jim

This one of my best pieces yet.  I made this seed pot as a gift for my sister.  The main body is from a gorgious piece of bubinga.  The base and rim are gaboon ebony.  The feature ring is chakte viga (a.k.a. paela), shedua and maple.

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Nov

30

Maple Burl Bowl

By Jim

My first burl turning.  This bowl was once mistaken for pottery!

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Nov

29

Curly Maple Bowl

By Jim

I turned this bowl very thin out of a solid block of curly maple. It features a cocobolo disk in the bottom and two burned in rings on the rim. Some companies sell specialty tools to burn rings in turnings like this, but if you read the description, they’re just pieces of wire with wooden handles. Visit my shop made tools page to see mine.

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Nov

24

Cocobolo and Maple Candlesticks

By Jim

This is one of my earliest projects.  It was before I knew how bad cocobolo dust was.  I soon learned after the burning watering eyes and sneezing fit.

 

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