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Dec

30

Wine Bottle Holders

By Jim

Some last minute Christmas gifts.  I made these gravity-defying wine bottle holders for the vino lovers in the family.  I really like the way the walnut & chakte viga look together.  I’ve already gotten another order for a family visit on Friday.  I guess I’d better get working!

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(2 votes, average: 4.00 out of 5)
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Dec

30

Cherry Table

By Jim

I took the opportunity over the holidays to take pictures of the cherry table I had made for my parents some time back.  I got a nice piece of curly cherry for the top and drawer front.  I used analine dye instead of stain so the figure wouldn’t be obscured.  It was also my first real attempt at hand-cut half-blind dovetails on the drawer.

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(1 votes, average: 4.00 out of 5)
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Dec

3

How To Make A Card Scraper Holder

By Jim

Scrapers are an excellent way to prepare a surface for finish.  They are more efficient than abrasives and produce a nicer surface.  Unfortunately, it can be tiring holding the scraper in a bent position while using it, and it can get uncomfortably hot.  Some companies sell holders for scrapers, but I made my own.

What you’ll need

  • A scrap piece of hardwood
  • Two 3/4″ pan-head screws
  • Two fender washers
  • A thumbscrew (about 1″ long) and nut to fit it
  • Epoxy

Instructions

  1. Cut a scrap piece of 3/4″ thick hardwood a couple of inches wider and 1/2″ or so shorter than your scraper (I used red oak)
  2. Center your scraper width-wise and draw lines down the edges for the screws to hold it to the board
  3. Mark the center of the of the board for the thumbscrew that will hold it bent
  4. Drill a pilot hole for the pan-head screws, centered vertically, the width of your screws plus an 1/8″ outside each line you drew marking the edges
  5. Drill a hole in the center of the board the diameter of the nut as deep as the nut is thick
  6. Drill a hole all the way through the center of the board slightly larger than the thumbscrew – it should be snug but slip through without force
  7. Center the nut over the larger center hole and trace the outline
  8. Use a chisel to remove wood for the nut recess following your outline
  9. Epoxy the nut into the recess and let dry
  10. Lay the scraper flat on the block and fasten it down with the panhead screws and washers
  11. Thread the thumbscrew through the back of the block and tighten until the scraper is bent to the desired shape

You can also round the edges of the block to make it more comfortable.  Enjoy!

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(9 votes, average: 3.33 out of 5)
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Nov

30

Yellowheart & Bloodwood Vases

By Jim

I made these vases to be part of a set.  They both feature a simple design with a raise ring around the rim.  I intended to make a third piece of purpleheart slightly taller and narrower than the bloodwood piece and slightly shorter and wider than the yellowheart piece.  I think it will tie the set together.

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Nov

30

Wood Balls

By Jim

This is perhaps my most impractical yet most interesting project.  People who visit my house and see them can’t help but pick them up and ask what kind of wood each one is.  To answer that question, look at the picture with the balls in a row.  From left to right the woods are maple, red oak, cherry, chakte viga, mahogany, ipe, wenge, black palm, bubinga, chakte kok, bloodwood and purpleheart.  It’s tough to make out some of the darker colors, but it’s a good sampling.  I intended these to be my samples for folks to pick out woods for projects instead of the traditional 1/2″x3″x6″ block.  I’ll have to make more someday to reflect all the species with which I work.

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(4 votes, average: 3.50 out of 5)
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Nov

30

Western Red Cedar Bowl

By Jim

Even know this bowl is very small, it catches the eye with the vibrant red and yellow colors.  Unfortunately, the rim is very thin and got a small chip in it.

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Nov

30

Small Walnut Bowl

By Jim

I like this bowl.  It’s small and simple with only two burned in rings adorning it.  You can see a little sapwood around the rim, but I think it adds character.

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(1 votes, average: 4.00 out of 5)
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Nov

30

Walnut and Bloodwood Box

By Jim

The sides of this box are made from two pieces of walnut.  You can see from the detail picture how the grain is continuous around the mitered corner.

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Nov

30

Red Oak Dresser

By Jim

This is the first (serious) piece of furniture I ever made.  I worked on it for about 10 months in my basement while my wife was pregnant with my older son for whom I made it.  It’s made from solid red oak and oak veneered plywood.  It has brass pulls that don’t really go with the piece.  But, this was before I knew that the dresser is country style and the pulls, traditional.  Someday I’ll make country style handles out of oak and save the brass pulls for a highboy.

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(1 votes, average: 2.00 out of 5)
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Nov

30

Poplar & Walnut Vase

By Jim

My first attempt at segmented turning using staves (vertical segments as opposed to rings).

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