Featuring the Woodworking of Jim Voss

Jan

4

Walnut Salad Bowl Set (finished)

By Jim

After a very long delay, I finished the set of walnut salad bowls for Andy and Danielle.  It wasn’t quite in time to be a wedding gift, but it was only a couple of days late for a house-warming gift.

It turns out the walnut logs from my uncle weren’t properly dried and had severe checking.  At least 5 bowls exploded on me.  I ended up buying a 8/4 kiln dried walnut board for the bowls.  I was able to get the serving bowl out of one of the logs though.  You can see how much better the figure is in wood and how much deeper the color is (it’s the one with the natural edge).

They’re finished with three coats Behlen’s Salad Bowl Finish so I don’t poison my friends with the heavy metal driers in other finishes.

Now I can move on to other projects guilt free!

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Jan

5

Bubinga Knife Display Tables Finished

By Jim

FINALLY!!  After months of hard work in hour or two increments I finished the tables.  I’m very excited and proud of them.  I hope Marvin likes them and Julia sends me some picture once he puts his knife colletion in them.

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Aug

10

Bubinga Knife Display Tables – Update

By Jim

Just finished ripping the 8/4 bubinga stock for the legs. Fhew! It’s so hard and dense, the saw blew the breaker 4 times. There’s a bit of burning (as I expected), but i ripped them slightly wide to allow for a quick pass through the jointer or a couple of passes with a hand plane to clean them up. Based on tonight’s experience, I’m guessing I’ll have to sharpen my chisels a few times while squaring up the mortises.

Aug

9

Logan’s Box

By Jim

Here’s a box I made for my Godson Logan. I don’t know what a little boy will keep in a box like this – frogs? worms? But, I hope he thinks whatever is in there is special.

It’s made of shedua with zebrawood on the sides joined with through dovetails, and a solid zebrawood top with three bloodwood plugs. On the days I his Godfather, the three plugs represent the Holy Trinity. On the days that I his cool Uncle Jim, they represent Wolverine’s (a.k.a. Logan) three claws.

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Aug

3

Cross and Two Rings

By Jim

While I’ve been hard at work on the walnut bowl set, I’ve taken a few minutes out (mostly when frustrated) to make a few quick projects.  I found some interesting wood jewelry on http://www.esty.com and thought I’d give it a try.

Here’s a cross made from chakte viga that I wear.  And, two rings made from bloodwood and gaboon ebony.  Chakte Viga is quickly becoming my favorite wood.

I opened a store on esty under the name lignified, but I haven’t listed anything yet.  If you want me to make you something, just put in a private alchemy request :). 

Also, this was a good post for me to test out my new portable lightbox.

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Jun

17

Walnut Bowl Set – Part 1

By Jim

I started working a walnut salad bowl set for a wedding present for my close friends Andy & Danielle. My Uncle Charlie gave me a couple of walnut log sections he’s had air drying for a decade or so. There’s a bit of end checking as you can see, but with careful layout, I should have enough good wood to make 6 or 8 bowls.

Jun

11

Bubinga Knife Display Tables – Part 1

By Jim

I just took a commision from cousin Marvin to make four nesting tables to display his knife collection. He wanted to see drawings first, so I had an excuse to learn how to use Google SketchUp. Very cool. Here are the drawings I produced on my first attempt with the program. More to come on the tables as I progress.

May

6

Cherry Toybox

By Jim

Hooray!!! This weekend I finally finished a toybox for my niece that I started almost two years ago. It was just one of those projects that never seemed to get done.

The top, front, sides and decorative portion of the back are solid cherry. The lower portion of the back is cherry veneered plywood. The bottom is oak veneered plywood. The front is joined to the sides with hand-cut dovetails. The back is rabbetted into the sides. The decorative piece at the top of the back is joined to the rail below it with dowels and mortised into the sides. The top is attached with a piano hinge and has a soft-close mechanism so Isabella won’t hurt her little hands.


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Apr

28

Maple and Bloodwood Handplane

By Jim

I’ve recently been able to get back in to the shop.  While working on a toybox for my neice that I started almost two years ago, I stole some time to make a wooden handplane.  I’ve been wanting to do this for a while since I found these plans.

After shopping for a while, I found blades for wooden planes from Lee Valley. They gave enough information for me to realize it was basically just a rectangular piece of metal with a bevel ground on one end. Being cheapfrugal, I searched and found a similarly sized piece of the same O1 tool steel from onlinemetals.com. This cost about the same price for a length that would yeild at least three plane blades.

I made the body and wedge out of hard maple, and the sole and pin out of bloodwood. Both hard and dense woods that should last for a long time. As you can see, my metal-working skills aren’t quite up to par, but the blade should do.

There are a couple of other different sets of plans for wooden hand planes that I want to make too:


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Jan

18

Mechanical Marvels 1 & 2

By Jim

I bought a book a while back called Making Mechanical Marvels in Wood and I finally got around to actually building some of them. I’ve made the first two – the cam & follower and the eccentric drive.  They’re quick to make, you can use scraps and people love to play with them.  I also finally got to start using the fifteen pound box of hardwood scraps I got from Eisenbran’s.

The bases are red oak.  The cam is purpleheart.  The follower is ebony (I think).  The pillow block is maple burl (again, I think).  On the eccentric drive, the disc is kingwood.  The ring is lacewood.  The piston and crank handle are chakte-kok.  The rotating pillow block at the top is, um, uh, I don’t know.

These projects call for a lot of dowels – some as small as 1/8″.  So, I remembered hearing about how to make your own dowels on the cheap.  I took a piece of scratch stock (sheet metal) and drilled a hole for each size dowel I wanted to make.  Leave the burr on the exit side, as this will be used to cut the dowel.  Cut a strip of wood square slightly larger than the diameter of the dowel.  Chuck up the square in your hand drill and push the stick through the hole while rotating it with the drill.  You can hold some sandpaper on the dowel while spinning it in the drill to make it a bit smoother.  I did turn some of the larger diameter pieces on my lathe, but the smaller ones were quick to make with the method described above.

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